Max Egger’s The Lighthouse a movie

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I remember the first time I finished watching The Shining very vividly. Part of the reason why it is still so fresh in my mind even now is its classic refusal to make sense. I obsessed about what all of it could mean; it prompted me to trek to the center of what made film itself tick. I researched subtext and the use of color and the Bible. Something about The Shining stroked a hidden corner of my mind that even I didn’t fully understand, something somewhat characteristic of Kubrick’s films. Max Eggers’ recent period-horror-piece ‘The Lighthouse’ takes a page from Kubrick’s book, conducting the screen and commanding the nerves.mIn 1890’s New England, two naval officers assume managerial duties of a roaring lighthouse, crawling with sea birds and torrential bleakness. The film’s cinematography does a lot of the heavy lifting in terms of theatrics. The use of the 3:2 aspect ratio and black and white film stock smashes the film into claustrophobia. Pattinson’s Efriam Winslow exists in callous acceptance, bordering on malace. The only comparison one could perhaps draw would be to Ryan Gosling’s K in Blade Runner 2049. To me, this film may be the film that finally graces Willem Dafoe with an Oscar. His hoarse, ticky, pirate mannerisms contrast with Pattinson’s performance in the most confrontational way possible. The films maritime theme is curdled by his oracle-like monologues, pushed through a lathered on Dorsett British accent. Personally, this is my favorite performance from Dafoe. Additionally, ‘The Lighthouse’ would not be what it is without its stellar production design. All that the movie seeks to instill upon the audience is directly informed by an excellent choice for location, wardrobe, and makeup commanding nerves. In 1890’s New England, two naval officers assume managerial duties of a roaring lighthouse, crawling with sea birds and torrential bleakness. The film’s cinematography does a lot of the heavy lifting in terms of theatrics. The use of the 3:2 aspect ratio and black and white film stock smashes the film into claustrophobia. Pattinson’s Efriam Winslow exists in callous acceptance, bordering on malace.